June 19 is World Sickle Cell Awareness Day

Posted June 13th, 2017 by Be The Match and filed in News
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Constance, marrow transplant recipient

Did you know: in the United States, sickle cell disease (SCD) affects about 70,000-100,000 people. It is most common among African Americans and Hispanics, but is also found in other ethnic groups. The only known cure for SCD is a blood or marrow transplant, which replaces the patient’s diseased blood-forming cells with healthy ones from a matched donor.

SCD is an inherited disease, named for the crescent- or sickle-shaped red blood cells it causes. These defective cells can get stuck in small blood vessels, blocking them. This keeps red blood cells and the oxygen they carry from getting to all parts of the body. Complications of SCD can range from mild tiredness (fatigue) to more severe symptoms such as strokes, heart attacks, infections, organ damage and repeated episodes of severe pain.

A blood or marrow transplant is the only known cure for SCD. And because SCD disproportionately affects African American and Hispanic patients, there is urgent need to add more individuals of African American and Hispanic heritage to Be The Match Registry.

A legislative team from Be The Match will be in Washington D.C., for World Sickle Cell Awareness Day, advocating for increased awareness of SCD and the struggles patients and their families face, as well as secure additional funding to help more patients live longer, healthier lives.

Meet Kami, a courageous young girl living with sickle cell. Help her find a donor by watching and sharing her story

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